Theatre Etiquette circa 1920

Just saw this in an old program I have from 1920. “One who has a constant and uncontrollable inclination to cough or sneeze should not remain in a crowded public place.  Unless the face is covered with the handkerchief,  coughing or sneezing is dangerous to every neighbor reached by the spray. Well persons will be benefited by the diversion of the theatre; sick persons should be at home — for their own good and for the public good. Fear is a great factor in lowering resistance. Go about your affairs calmly and unafraid” Royal S. Copeland, M.D., Commissioner of Health. From a 1920 Program for “Morris Gest Midnight Whirl” at Century Grove Theatre, New York City— Music by Gershwin.

Just saw this in an old program I have from 1920.

One who has a constant and uncontrollable inclination to cough or sneeze should not remain in a crowded public place.  Unless the face is covered with the handkerchief,  coughing or sneezing is dangerous to every neighbor reached by the spray. Well persons will be benefited by the diversion of the theatre; sick persons should be at home — for their own good and for the public good.

Fear is a great factor in lowering resistance. Go about your affairs calmly and unafraid

Royal S. Copeland, M.D.,

Commissioner of Health.

From a 1920 Program for “Morris Gest Midnight Whirl” at Century Grove Theatre, New York City— Music by Gershwin.